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Crinoline


Crinoline was originally a stiff fabric with a weft of horse-hair and a warp of cotton or linen thread.
 
Crinoline, French for 'crin' and 'lin', meaning horsehair and linen respectively, first appeared around 1830. By 1850 the word had come to mean a stiffened petticoat or rigid skirt-shaped structure of steel designed to support the skirts of a woman’s dress into the required shape. Crinolines worn today are usually part of a formal outfit, such as prom or wedding dresses. Modern crinolines are most often constructed of several layers of stiff net, with flounces to extend the skirt. If there is a hoop in the crinoline, it will probably be made of plastic or nylon, which are low in cost, lightweight and flexible. With the recent trend towards lavish weddings and grandiose bridal attire, the crinoline has started making a comeback.

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